A SPOONFUL OF HOPE

Many years ago, in a report on correctional education in Illinois prepared by the Illinois Criminal Justice Authority, an astounding statement was made that still holds true today:

“The challenge for… practitioners, and for the educational system as a whole, is to find a way to encourage adults who are scarred by past failures to seize control of their lives and commit themselves to change. Pouring funds into new programs or dramatically reforming the system (alone) will not address this more fundamental human dilemma.”

The authors of Chicken Soup for the Prisoner’s Soul have found “a way to encourage adults who are scarred by past failures…” The way is to give hope through stories – one story, one “spoonful” at a time. The book’s 101 stories of real people who, despite persistent failures, incarceration and hopelessness, were able to “seize control of their lives and commit themselves to change” is a powerful draw out of the hopelessness so often at the root of incarceration.

Chicken Soup for the Prisoner’s Soul should be available to all who are incarcerated – and to the people in their lives.